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Believe It or ‘Nut’, Almonds Can Help You Cut Calories - Neuroscience News

Believe It or ‘Nut’, Almonds Can Help You Cut Calories - Neuroscience News

Believe It or ‘Nut’, Almonds Can Help You Cut Calories - Neuroscience News
Nov 21, 2022 1 min, 38 secs

Summary: People who ate almonds lowered their energy intake by 300 kilojoules at their following meal.

Almonds alter appetite-regulating hormones and help to reduce food intake.

Examining how almonds can affect appetite, researchers found that a snack of 30-50 grams of almonds could help people cut back on the number of kilojoules they consume each day.

Published in the European Journal of Nutrition, the study found that people who consumed almonds – as opposed to an energy-equivalent carbohydrate snack – lowered their energy intake by 300 kilojoules (most of which came from junk food) at the subsequent meal.

“Our research examined the hormones that regulate appetite, and how nuts – specifically almonds – might contribute to appetite control.”.

“We found that people who ate almonds experienced changes in their appetite-regulating hormones, and that these may have contributed to reduced food intake (by 300kJ).”.

The findings of this study show that eating almonds produce small changes to people’s energy intake, Dr Carter says this may have clinical effects in the long term.

We are now excited to look at how almonds might affect appetite during a weight loss diet and how they might assist with weight management in the long term.”.

“Acute feeding with almonds compared to a carbohydrate-based snack improves appetite-regulating hormones with no effect on self-reported appetite sensations: a randomised controlled trial” by Sharayah Carter et al.

Acute feeding with almonds compared to a carbohydrate-based snack improves appetite-regulating hormones with no effect on self-reported appetite sensations: a randomised controlled trial.

This study compared postprandial changes in appetite-regulating hormones and self-reported appetite ratings after consuming almonds (AL, 15% of energy requirement) or an isocaloric carbohydrate-rich snack bar (SB).

Appetite-regulating hormones and self-reported appetite sensations, measured using visual analogue scales, were assessed immediately before snack food consumption, and at 30, 60, 90 and 120 min following snack consumption

Self-reported appetite ratings and energy intake following the buffet did not differ between groups

More favourable appetite-regulating hormone responses to AL did not translate into better self-reported appetite or reduced short-term energy consumption

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