Don't Miss: Hunter's, Blood Moon and Orionid Meteor Shower - SciTechDaily
Oct 20, 2021 6 mins, 24 secs

The next full Moon will be on Wednesday morning, October 20, 2021, appearing opposite the Sun (in Earth-based longitude) at 10:57 a.m.

On Wednesday, October 20, (the day of the full Moon), morning twilight will begin at 6:25 a.m.

By Friday, November 19 (the day of the full Moon after next), morning twilight will begin at 5:54 a.m.

This shower is expected to be active from October 2 to November 7, 2021, with a peak on the morning of October 21, the day after the full Moon.

On the evening of Wednesday, October 20, 2021, (the day of the full Moon), as evening twilight ends (at 7:20 p.m. EDT), the brightest planet visible will be Venus, appearing 10 degrees above the southwestern horizon.

The bright planet Venus will appear to shift left along the southwestern horizon each evening, appearing brighter and higher above the horizon as it shifts closer to the Earth.

The waxing Moon will appear to pass near Venus on November 7, Saturn on November 10, and Jupiter on November 11, 2021.

By the evening of Friday, November 19, 2021, (the day of the full Moon after next), as evening twilight ends (at 5:53 p.m. EST), the brightest planet visible will be Venus, appearing 14 degrees above the southwestern horizon.

The bright star Aldebaran will just be rising, appearing about 8 degrees below the full Moon on the east-northeastern horizon.

On the morning of October 20, 2021 (the day of the full Moon), as morning twilight begins (at 6:25 a.m. EDT), the only visible planet in the sky will be Mercury, appearing about 5 degrees above the eastern horizon.

The planet Mercury will appear at its highest above the horizon for this appearance on October 25, 2021, after which it will begin shifting back toward the horizon.

The waning Moon will pass near the bright star Aldebaran on October 24, Pollux on October 27 and 28, and Regulus on October 30, 2021.

On the morning of October 30, the bright star Spica will begin appearing above the horizon at the time morning twilight begins, appearing to the lower right of Mercury.

Mercury and Spica will appear at their closest on the morning of November 2, with Spica appearing 3 degrees to the right of Mercury.

November 10 will be the first morning that Mercury will no longer be above the horizon as morning twilight begins, but if you have a clear view of the east-southeastern horizon, you should be able to see the fainter planet Mars appearing just a degree to the right of Mercury after morning twilight begins but before the sky becomes too bright to see Mars.

Beginning November 13, the planet Mars will begin appearing above the east-southeastern horizon as morning twilight begins.

By the morning of November 19, 2021 (the day of the full Moon after next), as morning twilight begins (at 6:25 a.m. EST), the only visible planet in the sky will be Mars, appearing just a degree above the east-southeastern horizon.

Thursday evening into early Friday morning, October 14 to 15, 2021, the bright planet Jupiter will appear above the waxing gibbous Moon.

Jupiter will appear about 9 degrees to the upper left of the Moon as evening twilight ends at 7:28 p.m.

Jupiter will shift clockwise around the Moon as the night progresses, appearing about 7 degrees to the upper right of the Moon as the Moon sets in the west-southwest about 2 hours after midnight (Friday morning at 1:54 a.m.).

By Friday evening, October 15, 2021, the waxing gibbous Moon will have shifted such that Jupiter will appear about 9 degrees to the upper right of the Moon as evening twilight ends (at 7:27 p.m. EDT).

It will be the first morning that the planet Mercury will appear above the eastern horizon at the time morning twilight begins at 6:46 a.m.

Saturday evening, the bright star Antares will appear below the even brighter planet, Venus.

As mentioned above, the full Moon will be Wednesday morning, October 20, 2021, at 10:57 a.m.

The Moon will appear full for about three days around this time, from Monday night through Thursday morning (and possibly the earlier part of Thursday evening).

The Orionid Meteor Shower is predicted to peak the morning of Thursday, October 21, 2021, but the light of the full Moon will interfere with our ability to see these meteors this year.

Saturday night into Sunday morning, October 23 to 24, 2021, the bright star Aldebaran will appear below the waning gibbous Moon.

with Aldebaran about 7 degrees below the Moon, and the pair will appear high in the west as morning twilight begins at 6:29 a.m.

On Monday morning, October 25, 2021, as morning twilight begins at 6:30 a.m.

Tuesday morning, October 26, 2021, will be the first morning that the planet Mars will appear above the horizon about 30 minutes before sunrise around 6:59 a.m.

Tuesday night into Wednesday morning, October 26 to 27, and again on Wednesday night into Thursday morning, October 27 to 28, 2021, the bright star Pollux will appear near the waning gibbous Moon.

By the time the Moon reaches its highest in the sky for the night on Wednesday morning at 6:06 a.m., Pollux will appear about 6 degrees to the upper left of the Moon.

By moonrise on Thursday night (at 11:13 p.m.), Pollux will appear about 5 degrees above the Moon, and the pair will appear to separate as Wednesday night proceeds into Thursday morning.

Thursday afternoon, October 28, 2021, the waning Moon will appear half-full as it reaches its last quarter at 4:05 p.m.

Friday afternoon, October 29, 2021, will be when the planet Venus reaches its greatest angular separation from the Sun as seen from the Earth for this apparition (called greatest elongation), appearing half-lit through a telescope.

Because the angle of the line between the Sun and Venus and the line of the horizon changes with the seasons, the date when Venus and the Sun appear farthest apart as seen from the Earth is not the same as when Venus appears highest above the horizon as evening twilight ends, which will occur on November 28.

On Saturday morning, October 30, 2021, the bright star Regulus will appear below the waning crescent Moon.

The Moon will have shifted to about 6 degrees from Regulus by the time morning twilight begins at 6:34 a.m.

Shortly before dawn on Tuesday morning, November 2, 2021, if you have a clear view of the east-southeastern horizon, you may be able to see the bright star Spica appearing about 3 degrees to the lower right of the bright planet Mercury.

The next morning, Wednesday, November 3, 2021, the waning crescent Moon will join Mercury and Spica to a triangle on the east-southeastern horizon.

On Saturday evening, November 6, 2021, if you have a very clear view of the southwestern horizon, you might be able to see the bright star Antares about 4 degrees below the thin, waxing crescent Moon.

On Sunday evening, the bright planet Venus will appear about 5 degrees to the upper left of the thin, waxing crescent Moon.

Wednesday morning, November 10, 2021, will be the first morning that the planet Mercury will no longer be above the horizon as morning twilight begins.

It will also be the morning when bright Mercury will appear nearest to the fainter planet Mars.

Wednesday evening, the planet Saturn will appear about 6 degrees to the upper right of the waxing half-Moon with the brighter planet Jupiter appearing farther to the upper left.

The Moon will appear about 28 degrees above the southern horizon as evening twilight ends at 5:58 p.m.

On Thursday morning, November 11, 2021, the Moon will appear half-full as it reaches its first quarter at 7:46 a.m.

On Thursday evening, the bright planet Jupiter will appear about 5 degrees to the upper right of the waxing half-Moon, with the planet Saturn appearing farther to the right.

The Moon will appear about 31 degrees above the southern horizon as evening twilight ends at 5:58 p.m.

Beginning Saturday morning, November 13, 2021, the planet Mars will begin appearing above the east-southeastern horizon as morning twilight begins.

The full Moon after next will be Friday morning, November 19, 2021, at 3:58 a.m.


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