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No, physicists didn’t make a real wormhole. What they did was still pretty cool - Ars Technica

No, physicists didn’t make a real wormhole. What they did was still pretty cool - Ars Technica

No, physicists didn’t make a real wormhole. What they did was still pretty cool - Ars Technica
Dec 02, 2022 1 min, 35 secs

You might be forgiven for thinking that undiscovered status had changed if you only read the headlines this week announcing that physicists had used a quantum computer to make a wormhole, reporting on a new paper published in Nature.

Let's set the record straight right away: This isn't a bona fide traversable wormhole—i.e., a bridge between two regions of spacetime connecting the mouth of one black hole to another, through which a physical object can pass—in any real, physical sense.

"Could this method lead to a simulation of a real wormhole someday?

Could it lead to making a real wormhole.

So what is this thing that was "created" in a quantum computer if it's not an actual wormhole.

That's why the authors prefer the term "quantum experiment" because they were able to use Google's Sycamore quantum computer to create a highly entangled quantum system and make direct measurements of specific key properties.

The holographic principle began as a proposed solution to the black hole information paradox in the 1990s.

But problems arise when quantum gravity enters the picture because the rules of quantum mechanics hold that information can never be destroyed.

And in quantum mechanics, black holes are incredibly complex objects and thus should contain a great deal of information.

He also introduced the notion of "Hawking radiation": The black hole will emit a tiny bit of energy, decreasing its mass by a corresponding amount?

The smaller the black hole, the more quickly it disappears.

In the case of AdS/CFT, the duality is between a model of spacetime known as anti-de Sitter space (AdS)—which has constant negative curvature, unlike our own de Sitter universe—and a quantum system called conformal field theory (CFT), which lacks gravity but has quantum entanglement.

As noted above, the authors of the Nature paper didn't make a physical wormhole—they manipulated some entangled quantum particles in ordinary flat spacetime.

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