Scientists Search for the Cause of Mysterious COVID-Related Inflammation in Children - Yahoo Entertainment
Oct 21, 2021 3 mins, 29 secs
More than 5,200 children have developed multisystem inflammatory syndrome, or MIS-C, a rare complication from COVID-19.

Hospital staffers diagnosed Dante with multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, or MIS-C, a rare but life-threatening complication of COVID-19 in which a hyperactive immune system attacks a child's body.

children diagnosed with COVID have developed MIS-C.

Throughout the pandemic, MIS-C has followed a predictable pattern, sending waves of children to the hospital about a month after a COVID surge.

At the Medical University of South Carolina Shawn Jenkins Children's Hospital, for example, doctors in September treated 37 children with COVID and nine with MIS-C — the highest monthly totals since the pandemic began.

Although most children who develop MIS-C were previously healthy, 80% develop heart complications.

Doctors have gotten better at diagnosing and treating MIS-C; the mortality rate has fallen from 2.4% to 0.7% since the beginning of the pandemic. Adults also can develop a post-COVID inflammatory syndrome, called MIS-A; it's even rarer than MIS-C, with a mortality rate seven times as high as that seen in children.

Although MIS-C is new, doctors can treat it with decades-old therapies used for Kawasaki disease, a pediatric syndrome that also causes systemic inflammation.

Significantly, the genes are all involved in "removing the brakes" from the immune system, which could contribute to the hyperinflammation seen in MIS-C, said Dr.

And it raises new questions: If these children are genetically susceptible to immune problems, why didn't they become seriously ill from earlier childhood infections.

Most children with MIS-C test negative for COVID, suggesting that the body has already cleared the novel coronavirus from the nose and upper airways.

Lael Yonker noticed that children with MIS-C are far more likely to develop gastrointestinal symptoms — such as stomach pain, diarrhea and vomiting — than the breathing problems often seen in acute COVID.

Yonker, a pediatric pulmonologist at Boston's MassGeneral Hospital for Children, recently found evidence that the source of those symptoms could be the coronavirus, which can survive in the gut for weeks after it disappears from the nasal passages, Yonker said.

In a May study in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, Yonker and her colleagues showed that more than half of patients with MIS-C had genetic material — called RNA — from the coronavirus in their stool.

The body breaks down viral RNA very quickly, Chou said, so it's unlikely that genetic material from a COVID infection would still be found in a child's stool one month later.

In some children, the virus irritates the intestinal lining, creating microscopic gaps that allow viral particles to escape into the bloodstream, Yonker said.

Blood tests in children with MIS-C found that they had a high level of the coronavirus spike antigen — an important protein that allows the virus to enter human cells.

Viral particles in the blood could cause problems far beyond upset stomachs, Yonker said.

Although the first doctors to treat MIS-C compared it to Kawasaki disease — which also causes red eyes, rashes and high fevers — Arditi notes that MIS-C more closely resembles toxic shock syndrome, a life-threatening condition caused by particular types of strep or staph bacteria releasing toxins into the blood.

Toxins released by these bacteria can trigger a massive overreaction from key immune system fighters called T cells, which coordinate the immune system's response, said Arditi, director of the pediatric infectious diseases division at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

In a typical response to a foreign substance — known as an antigen — the immune system activates only about 0.01% of all T cells, Arditi said.

Although multiple studies have found that children with MIS-C have fewer total T cells than normal, Arditi's team has found an explosive increase in a subtype of T cells capable of interacting with a superantigen.

Carrie Lucas, an assistant professor of immunobiology at Yale, whose team has identified changes in immune cells and proteins in the blood of children with MIS-C.


1. F.T.C. Sues to Block Nvidia’s Takeover of Arm - The New York Times
Dec 02, 2021 # politics 1 min, 15 secs
2. 'I started screaming. He wouldn't let go.' Woman attacked by raccoon while hanging Christmas lights outside of her Lancaster home - The Boston Globe
Dec 08, 2021 # health 37 secs
3. COVID-19 Omicron variant detected in Washington - Q13 FOX (Seattle)
Dec 05, 2021 # health 1 min, 2 secs
4. Get ready for today's PS5 restock at Walmart right here - TechRadar
Dec 08, 2021 # technology 16 secs
5. Can Germany’s New Chancellor Revive the Left in Europe? - The New York Times
Dec 07, 2021 # politics 2 mins, 49 secs
6. Ron Johnson Claims Fauci Has 'Overhyped' Omicron: 'Did the Exact Same Thing With AIDS' - Mediaite
Dec 02, 2021 # health 22 secs
7. Ghislaine Maxwell trial: Live updates from Day 8 - New York Post
Dec 08, 2021 # politics 8 secs
8. Mother dies from COVID-19 shortly after giving birth to fourth child - 14 News WFIE Evansville
Dec 07, 2021 # health 21 secs
9. Nicole Kidman almost backed out of playing Lucille Ball after receiving backlash for not resembling her - The A.V. Club
Dec 03, 2021 # entertainment 44 secs
10. COVID: East Bay omicron cases were vaccinated Kaiser staff - Pacifica Tribune
Dec 08, 2021 # health 51 secs
11. Fucili, famiglia e albero di Natale: l'assurda foto del deputato della destra americana
Dec 06, 2021 # breaking 35 secs
12. Zendaya And Tom Holland Red Carpet Debut As A Couple - BuzzFeed
Dec 06, 2021 # entertainment 3 secs
13. Study casts doubt on idea that marijuana improves sleep | TheHill - The Hill
Dec 07, 2021 # health 37 secs
14. Seagate introduces IronWolf Pro & Exos X20 20TB HDDs for necessity of large capacity drives for consumers - Wccftech
Dec 03, 2021 # technology 39 secs
15. US defense chief slams China's drive for hypersonic weapons - Associated Press
Dec 02, 2021 # politics 49 secs
16. Unrepresentative big surveys significantly overestimated US vaccine uptake - Nature.com
Dec 08, 2021 # health 21 mins, 23 secs

SUBSCRIBE

Get monthly updates and free resources.

CONNECT WITH US

© Copyright 2021 365NEWSX - All RIGHTS RESERVED